Saturday Jul 2, 2022
Saturday Jul 2, 2022

MoNA's first annual art festival held at Thamel

"MoNA Annual Art Festival is a small effort to bring Nepali art and artists into limelight”, Hamal says.


Nepalnews
2021 Oct 07, 17:37, Kathmandu

The Museum of Nepali Art (MoNA) held their first annual art festival today at Kathmandu Guest House Dream Garden, Thamel. The festival was an effort to bring Nepali art and artists to the limelight and also to support children battling cancer.

Thirty-three renowned Nepali artists came together for the day-long ‘live-art congregation’.

The event was kicked off by popular actor Rajesh Hamal at 12 pm.


Abdullah Tuncer Kececi(General Manager of Turkish Airlines Inc), Rajesh Hamal and his wife Madhu Bhattarai Hamal
Abdullah Tuncer Kececi(General Manager of Turkish Airlines Inc), Rajesh Hamal and his wife Madhu Bhattarai Hamal

“The world is attracted to our tradition and art. Therefore it is very important to preserve our originality. MoNA Annual Art Festival is a small effort to bring Nepali art and artists into limelight”, Hamal says. “Nepali culture and art is very unique. It is good to see modernization and western influence in our art, but we should not forget our roots”, he adds.

Other than promoting Nepali art and artists, the art festival also was a kickstarter for the idea of promoting Saat Ghumti, Thamel’s west end into an area focused on art and culture. The Art Street is the first attempt of promoting and dedicating a specific area into an intellectual, cultural and artistic district in Nepal. It also aims to promote Nepal as an art destination.

The start of the Art Street coincided with the inauguration of the Kathmandu Art House (KAH), a studio and art gallery where diverse art forms and styles practiced by living Nepali artists is shared under one roof.


Artist painting a Lord Ganesha.
Artist painting a Lord Ganesha.

The live artwork created during the event is available for purchase by the public. Part of the proceeds of the sale will go to support children fighting cancer at Kanti Children’s Hospital, Kathmandu.

22 year old Manish Dhoju was one of the artists in the festival. He realized that watercolors were not just a thing in his childhood.

“I wanted to draw something that looks like photographs,” he says. Dhoju learnt hyperrealism art through Google and YouTube videos. He used graphite (pencil), charcoal and white highlighter pen to create his art. “I used the white highlighter for the beard because it is very difficult to pull out white highlights from charcoal”, he adds.

Manish Dhoju working on his portrait. The theme of the image is hyper-realism. Photo: Prasan Gurung/Nepalnews
Manish Dhoju working on his portrait. The theme of the image is hyper-realism. Photo: Prasan Gurung/Nepalnews

Sangee Shrestha, a contemporary artist used minimal colors and lines in her art. It may look simple but it carries a deeper meaning. “The darker shades in my painting represent the sadness of life. The lighter shades and the upward spiral is an inspiration to not lose hope during difficult times in life”, she says.

Sangee Shrestha working on her painting. Photo: Prasan Gurung/Nepalnews
Sangee Shrestha working on her painting. Photo: Prasan Gurung/Nepalnews

Asha Dangol created an art piece portraying the anger of the mountains. “Mountains may not have life in them, but there is only so much that they can handle. With every climb, pollution is increasing on the mountains”, he says.

Asha Dangol (right) at the MoNA's Annual Art Festival. 
Photo: Prasan Gurung/Nepalnews
Asha Dangol (right) at the MoNA's Annual Art Festival. Photo: Prasan Gurung/Nepalnews

Jeevan Rajopadhyaya started his journey by doing landscapes in his early days. These days he is into abstract painting. “Nature never fails to inspire me. There are so many things in nature to be inspired from”, he says.

Jeevan Rajopadhyay working on his abstract art. Photo: Prasan Gurung/Nepalnews
Jeevan Rajopadhyay working on his abstract art. Photo: Prasan Gurung/Nepalnews

Binod Gautam, a stone carver was also present at the festival. He learnt stone carving skills at Swayambhunath. “I have been working as a stone carver for about 15 years now”, he says. Today, many of Gautam’s creations are on display in different museums.

Binod Gautam, Stone craving artist.
Binod Gautam, Stone craving artist.
Stone carvings ready to get sold.
Stone carvings ready to get sold.

The event became a gateway for artists, as Dangol explains “due to lockdowns, it was a difficult time for all artists. It feels good to be here and doing what I love. I look forward to coming to this festival again next year.”

READ ALSO:

The Museum of Nepali Art Kathmandu Guest House Dream Garden Thamel nepali actor Nepal. Nepali art Nepali artists
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